‘Gay Men Draw Vaginas’ Is Hilarious And Telling (NSFW)

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Gay men and vaginas — historically, the two are worlds apart. So what happens when you ask a gay man to sit down and draw one?

This is the question that led Keith Wilson and Shannon O’Malley to curate an ongoing public art project and upcoming picture book called “Gay Men Draw Vaginas.” With the results ranging from fine art to clever depictions, the results are both humorous and telling about the relationship between gay men and vaginas.

As the project is currently involved in a Kickstarter campaign, The Huffington Post chatted with the pair this week how the project got started, what’s surprised them the most and more.

The Huffington Post: Where did the inspiration for the project come from?

Keith Wilson: Three years ago, we were at a restaurant with a bunch of other homos and the topic of vaginas came up. After a few unenlightened comments came out of the mouths of the gay men, Shannon asked me to draw a vagina on the table with a crayon. After I did, everyone at our table gawked at it, critiqued it. It started a totally vaginal conversation in a restaurant full of children and families — fun stuff. Shannon asked my boyfriend, who was also at the table, to draw one. When he did, everyone wanted to scrutinize it and compare it to the other shitty vagina I’d made. The night was filled with vag chat.

Shannon O’Malley: The next week at work, I spontaneously asked a designer colleague, Chris Cerrato, to draw a vag. He thought that was funny, and later showed me his piece. He’d drawn a crotch covered by a Facebook “like” button. I just loved it. It was conceptual and funny and “of the time” and unexpected. After I saw Chris’s drawing my instinct was ask him to do a few more with the same feel, just for fun, especially since I had heard him talk about how he never had time to do his own artwork. He agreed. In casual conversation, at surface level, I knew asking gay guys to draw vaginas was funny because it zeroed in on what some people might have perceived as “opposites.” What I kept to myself were my navel-gazing meditations on “queer identity” and ideas people (and the culture) hold about women and bodies. The latter isn’t fun workplace conversation.

To Read more:

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5662312?utm_hp_ref=tw

James Nichols The Huffington Post

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